Lower Groundwater quality in Berkeley

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The 2000 final Public Hearing of the San Francisco Regional Water Control Board on amendments to SB 92-49 and the SF Basin Groundwater Plan that include the East Bay watershed. Public Comments & Regulatory Deliberations

he final Public Hearing of the San Francisco Regional Water Control Board on amendments to SB 92-49 and the SF Basin Groundwater Plan that include the East Bay watershed. PART 1: Public Comments
Just prior to the Board's approval of the new amendments to the Plan, several Berkeley residents spoke against the Board's actions that would lower protections & cleanup for Berkeley's municipal groundwater resources. The Regional Water Board adopted Order No. 00-025 on April 19, 2000. Recorded in Oakland. All Labor donated.

The final Public Hearing of the San Francisco Regional Water Control Board on amendments to SB 92-49 and the SF Basin Groundwater Plan that include the East Bay watershed. PART 2: Regulatory Comments to justify their actions that lowered protections & cleanup for Berkeley's municipal groundwater resources. The Regional Water Board adopted Order No. 00-025 on April 19, 2000. Recorded in Oakland by Berkeley Citizen. All Labor donated.

NOTE: In March, 1996, the Berkeley City Council responded to what they perceived as a weakening of the State Board Resolution 92-49 in State Board’s Executive Officer Walt Pettit’s proposed amendment to the resolution and in the recommendations found in the LLNL Report. Berkeley took the position that Resolution 92-49 gave Regional Boards authority to suspend remediation requirements on a case-by-case basis and suggested that any further loosening of these requirements not be adopted.

Berkeley felt that “the initial intent of a containment zone policy was to provide a process for the closure of sites that had undergone remediation but for technological and financial considerations were unable to achieve drinking water standards but would still protect human health and the environment. The containment zone policy as currently proposed does not reflect this goal. Therefore, the City of Berkeley will not adopt these policies, as currently proposed.”

Existing Toxics Management Division (TMD) policy is to preserve the water resource, where technologically and financially feasible, and this is consistent with existing State policy and with Berkeley policy set by Council in 1996. In the City’s position (discussed in Council in 1996), the resource is identified first and if found to not be of quality, then a lower level of clean up is required. Berkeley’s policy has several significant benefits, it reduces dependence on EBMUD water, less water is diverted from Sierra and Delta regions and provides an emergency resource if needed in the future.

TMD proposes taking it further by actually correctly identifying and encouraging the use of groundwater for irrigation or industry, where possible. This indicates a commitment of maintaining high environmental and health standards. Source: EAST BAY PLAIN GROUNDWATER BASIN BENEFICIAL USE EVALUATION REPORT Final Report. August 18, 2006 San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board Groundwater Committee
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